When our founders, Stephen, Matthew, and Aaron, started thinking about the future of technology, they wanted to give users a way to interact with digital devices in a natural and mobile environment. They came up with the idea of a wearable device that would use EMG signals from the forearm, rather than touch, voice control, or camera-based control. And since the Myo™ armband doesn’t rely on cameras, it can travel with the user wherever they go.

You’ve probably used camera-based motion control technologies such as Microsoft’s Kinect or Sony’s PlayStation Move. Without a doubt, these systems have been met with tons of excitement from tech enthusiasts and consumers interested in casual gaming, and introduced us to the idea of using movements of the body to control digital technologies. But, as is the case with most technologies, camera-based motion control comes with its limitations…

Microsoft’s Kinect can’t function unless the user is in line with the sensor bar. Sony’s PlayStation Move faces many of the same problems since a camera is used to detect the user and track movement. Other devices may restrict the user to sitting in front of the computer, forcing them to move their hands within the device’s frame of reference.

The mobility of Myo gives it an extensive list of uses, part of why our founders decided to bring this idea to life. With the ability to implement software support into computers, smart TVs, music players, and smartphones, Myo could virtually connect the user to his or her entire digital world.

As we move towards wearable, intuitive technologies, we believe that sensor-based control devices will take us to the next level of human-computer interaction. We’re so excited with the potential of Myo and we’re working harder than ever to make it a reality.

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